Doctor of Ministry Program

Our Doctor of Ministry program invites you to reimagine your ministry in light of contemporary realities. This new model of engagement allows you to explore your ministerial vocation within the context of Leadership for Witness: Engaging Public Life or Leadership for Wonder: Re-Enchanting Christian Life. Each concentration entails small classroom encounters with our resident faculty and fellow students as well as a travel seminar to the Texas-Mexico Borderlands or Ghost Ranch. As you move through the process you will integrate your learning and experiences by creating a portfolio that may include projects, artistic creations, and reflections.

Students in our Doctor of Ministry program represent the breadth of Christian liturgical and theological traditions, from both Protestant and Roman Catholic branches of the church. Through small classes led by resident faculty deeply committed to this program, you will find yourself immersed in a rich exchange of perspectives and ideas that will enhance your ability to lead faithfully.

Leadership for Witness

Program Elements

  • Four required seminars, offered in one-week intensive or hybrid (one week online, one week on campus) format

  • Travel Seminar to the Texas-Mexico Borderlands

  • Integrative Portfolio

Course Topics

Religion in American Life
Inspired by Jesus’s mission of recovery of sight to the blind, this course makes visible the assumed and often invisible structures of civil religion, American religious history, socio-political-economic forces, and the reification of nationalism in material culture and public rhetoric.
Power
Following Jesus to proclaim release to the captives, this course addresses power and powers biblically, theologically, ethically, and practically. 
Justice
To bring good news to the poor demands knowledge of the good news itself as well as knowledge of the poor—those who live deprived of economic resources and those deprived of hope. This course explores God’s vision for justice in contemporary life.
Freedom
The complexity of Jesus’s call to let the oppressed go free is on display in the chronic and urgent public matter of immigration, border security, dignity of persons, money, and race lived out in the borderlands. This course integrates the learning of the first three courses. A component of this course is a travel seminar to the Texas-Mexico borderlands.
Preaching and Communication
This course opens up the work of proclaiming the year of the Lord’s favor as rooted in scripture and tradition and yet contextual as truth enacted in the arts of language.
 

Integrative Portolio

Integrative portfolios contain the following elements:

Artifacts

An artifact is anything that demonstrates your work in courses or in related experiences on which you reflect critically. Artifacts may be:

• Essays or papers written for courses

• Projects undertaken for courses

• Course evaluations written by instructors

• Sermons or articles written for publication in newsletters

• Descriptions or transcriptions of interviews with significant figures in the ministry context

• Journals, recordings, or photographic records of travel seminars

• Visual, dramatic, or literary creations that reflect on course themes and subjects

• Other items that demonstrate student learning

Reflections

A reflection is a short, written work (1-2 pages) in which you reflect on an artifact or experience included in your portfolio. These reflections provide the opportunity to describe how you have integrated personally what you have learned in a class or through an experience. Ideally, you will connect learning in one course with learning in other courses. This process may raise questions for further research or reflection, including describing developing ideas for the integrative project.

Integrative Project

After you have completed course work in one of the two concentrations, you will design and execute an integrative project. The integrative project is a substantive piece of work. It may be a written thesis, a collection of shorter works closely connected to a research issue or question, a mixed-media presentation, or in other form as described in the project proposal and approved by the reader and academic dean. 

Program Costs

Entrance Fee: $300

Five Seminars, each: $1824

Integrative Project Supervision: $1824

Graduation Fee: $400

Total Cost: $11,644*

* The Seminary presently provides financial assistance to DMin students in the form of a $500 per seminar scholarship. The scholarship does not apply to the integrative project fee. This reduces the overall cost of the program by $2500.

NOTE: DMin students regularly take one semester per residency session at $1,824 per course.

A program continuation fee of $150 is charged for each term the student is not enrolled. All fees are subject to change. On-campus housing is available at a cost for doctoral students; housing is limited and available on a first-come, first-served basis. Meals may be purchased in the Seminary dining hall during the week from Monday breakfast through Friday lunch.

Leadership for Wonder

Program Elements

  • Four required seminars, offered in one-week intensive or hybrid (one week online, one week on campus) format

  • Travel Seminar to Ghost Ranch

  • Integrative Portfolio

Course Topics

Wonder and the Mind: Living Thoughtfully
How do we THINK about why what we believe (i.e. doctrines) matters 
Wonder and the Body: Living Justly
How do we EMBODY what we claim to believe (Christian ethics)
Wonder and Relationships: Living with Others
How do we SHARE life with one another (ecclesiology and vocation)
Wonder and the Soul: Living Before God
How do we PARTICIPATE in the life of God (Christian contemplation and practices)

Integrative Portfolio

Integrative portfolios contain the following elements:

Artifacts

An artifact is anything that demonstrates your work in courses or in related experiences on which you reflect critically. Artifacts may be:

• Essays or papers written for courses

• Projects undertaken for courses

• Course evaluations written by instructors

• Sermons or articles written for publication in newsletters

• Descriptions or transcriptions of interviews with significant figures in the ministry context

• Journals, recordings, or photographic records of travel seminars

• Visual, dramatic, or literary creations that reflect on course themes and subjects

• Other items that demonstrate student learning

Reflections

A reflection is a short, written work (1-2 pages) in which you reflect on an artifact or experience included in your portfolio. These reflections provide the opportunity to describe how you have integrated personally what you have learned in a class or through an experience. Ideally, you will connect learning in one course with learning in other courses. This process may raise questions for further research or reflection, including describing developing ideas for the integrative project.

Integrative Project

After you have completed course work in one of the two concentrations, you will design and execute an integrative project. The integrative project is a substantive piece of work. It may be a written thesis, a collection of shorter works closely connected to a research issue or question, a mixed-media presentation, or in other form as described in the project proposal and approved by the reader and academic dean. 

Program Costs

Entrance Fee: $300

Five Seminars, each: $1824

Integrative Project Supervision: $1824

Graduation Fee: $400

Total Cost: $11,644*

* The Seminary presently provides financial assistance to DMin students in the form of a $500 per seminar scholarship. The scholarship does not apply to the integrative project fee. This reduces the overall cost of the program by $2500.

NOTE: DMin students regularly take one semester per residency session at $1,824 per course.

A program continuation fee of $150 is charged for each term the student is not enrolled. All fees are subject to change. On-campus housing is available at a cost for doctoral students; housing is limited and available on a first-come, first-served basis. Meals may be purchased in the Seminary dining hall during the week from Monday breakfast through Friday lunch.